Veg, veg, veg – New York style

This is a version of an article also published by the Financial Times. New York’s culinary reputation has been built on protein: steaks, chops, burgers, fried chicken (now on offer with champagne at the appropriately named Birds & Bubbles on the Lower East Side) and pastrami. Invariably, these have been served in what to Europeans at least have appeared to be immense portions with the provision of a doggie bag as the vital, final conscience-salving ingredient. No longer. Although all of these remain on offer, I discern a major shift…






Eating, and queuing, like New Yorkers

It is now very obvious to anyone travelling to the US that food, wine and the hospitality industry receive so much wider media coverage today than in the past (see, for example, Union Square Cafe – 30-year-old icon with its CBS film crew trailing its owner Danny Meyer) and that this has had a decidedly positive effect on how these subjects are practised across this enormous and fascinating country. However, the most significant change in the social status of these subjects will never be noticed by Americans. It can be appreciated…






Happy 25th birthday, Tribeca Grill

A quarter-century is a long time in any relationship, whether amorous or business. For a restaurant to survive this long is most unusual. Tastes change. Partners, initially the best of friends, fall out or want to go in different directions, and leases come to an end, even if some restaurateurs manage to fend off the threat of redevelopment from landlords keen to maximise the value of their freehold properties. So the fact that Tribeca Grill, opened in 1990 by restaurateur Drew Nieporent in partnership with Robert De Niro in what…






Barbecue, taco, pizza and hot dogs, New York style

This article is also published in the Financial Times. Nothing, I recall, ever made my wife and I as popular with our children when we were all living under one roof as the possibility of our all spending a few days in New York over the festive period. The charms of being in the city that goes out of its way to make retail therapy easier than any other were immediately obvious, regardless of age or whose name was actually on the credit card. Eating out was a further attraction,…






Good fun in downtown and uptown New York

This article is also published in the Financial Times As customers use restaurants for a variety of different purposes – to do business, to meet friends or even to propose marriage – so do those who work in them. Their most immediate end is, of course, financial, and I hear that, even before the extra-busy holiday season, waiters in London and New York are currently earning very good money. But there are more subliminal, more professional desires underlying career choices in the hospitality business, the most ambitious of which is…






Reservations – Manhattan’s latest blood sport

This article was also published in the Financial Times. Any trip to New York seems to reflect the increasingly important role restaurants play in our lives. This process began 20 years ago over lunch with Bryan Miller, then my counterpart at the New York Times. He astutely explained that the sheer volume of restaurants in the city was directly connected to the price of property. Only the wealthy could afford an apartment with a dining room. Those who couldn’t, met in bars, cafes and restaurants. This phenomenon has now spread…






New York’s Calliope

This article was also published in the Financial Times.   Few of the restaurants that I have ever enjoyed have their origins quite as geographically widespread as those that underpin the charming Calliope on New York’s Lower East Side. Moreover, although Calliope opened less than a year ago and its owners, Eric and Ginevra Korsh (pictured below), are still only in their mid 30s, their restaurant has already managed to incorporate two generations of their family. I was welcomed into Calliope one Saturday morning at 11 am by Grace Korsh…






Mr Brooklyn?

This article was also published in the Financial Times. Walking 100 yards alongside restaurateur Andrew Tarlow, 42, on Broadway in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, between his café, Marlow & Sons, his Diner and his butcher’s, Marlow & Daughters, we bumped into his young female butcher carrying a tray of warm, sweet Italian sausages and his baker going home at the end of his nine-hour shift. Was there, I wondered, a candlestick maker involved, too? In fact, Tarlow and his obviously talented wife, Kate Huling, have not yet turned their attention to candles…






New York’s restaurants bounce back

This article was also published in the Financial Times.   No sooner had Mia Van Der Water, the petite sommelier atNorth End Grill in Battery Park, New York, poured our first glass of Burn Cottage Pinot Noir 2010 (made by a Californian in New Zealand) than she explained with pride how soon this restaurant had managed to open after Hurricane Sandy. ‘Fortunately, we are on the Brooklyn electric grid across the water so we were closed for only two days. And we all wanted to reopen as soon as possible…






How to run Le Bernardin

We are delighted to publish this extract from Nick’s new bookThe Art of the Restaurateur, which featured on the cover of last week’s Economist, no less. It’s a series of profiles of 20 of the world’s leading restaurateurs (as opposed to chefs) together with concrete examples of how to run a successful restaurant. On Monday we’ll announce a special offer for those who’d like to order a copy of the book at a discounted price. Maguy Le Coze has been the smiling, authoritative and glamorous restaurateur behind the success of…